BioSpec-nano Micro-volume UV-Vis Spectrophotometer

Spectrophotometer for Life Sciences

Micro-volume (small-volume) spectrophotometer - Biospec-nano

The Shimadzu BioSpec-nano is a low-maintenance micro-volume spectrophotometer designed for molecular biology research and modern life science laboratories. This innovative spectrophotometer offers superior detection limits, up to 10 times better compared to the competition, making it the perfect instrument for quantitation of DNA, RNA, protein analysis, and photometric measurements. Quantitation can be rapidly and simply carried out with very small sample volumes, as low as 1µL. Additionally, with dedicated functions, such as automated sample mounting and wiping, the BioSpec-nano offers a rapid 3-second analysis time and a 10-second cycle time between samples.

The included PC software packs include features such as quick analysis, full-spectrum measurement, single wavelength and multiple wavelength data measurement, and calibration curve builder. The built-in modes aid quantification of simple nucleic acids (RNA, dsDNA, ssDNA and OligoDNA), labeled nucleic acids and proteins in seconds with minimal effort. Additionally, when the automatic wiping function is enabled, the BioSpec-nano automatically cleans between samples, reducing carry-over between samples to eliminating the need for manual cleaning.

BioSpec-nano Features

  • Variable sample size: depending on application needs, the BioSpec-nano can perform a measurement on micro-volume samples as low as 1 µL - 2 µL, and 2 mL
  • Variable pathlength: quickly and easily switch from 0.2 mm, 0.7 mm and 5 mm pathlength options. The 5 mm pathlength allows for very low concentration sample measurement
  • Lowest detection limits: measurement as low as 0.15 ng/µL with the 5 mm pathlength option
  • Automatic wiping function: only life science spectrophotometer to include a standard wiping function to automatically clean between samples, reducing carry-over between samples without manual cleaning
  • Quick sample measurement time: BioSpec-nano uses a PDA detector, allowing for the fastest measurement time of 3 seconds per sample, enabling more samples to be analyzed daily
  • Easy-to-use software:
     
    • Basic operations can be conveniently performed with a few clicks on the software or function keys on the instrument itself. Analysis results can be converted to PDF or CSV files
    • Operations include quick analysis, full-spectrum data, single wavelength and multiple wavelength data measurement, and calibration curve builder
    • The built-in modes aid quantification of simple nucleic acids (RNA, dsDNA, ssDNA and OligoDNA), labeled nucleic acids and proteins in seconds with minimal effort
 

Request a Quote 

Related Products

Documents & Resources

Relevant Application Notes

 

Relevant Literature Citations

Abdelghany, A., BaSalamah, M., Idris, S., Ahmed, J., & Refaat, B. (2016). The fibrolytic potentials of vitamin D and thymoquinone remedial therapies: insights from liver fibrosis established by CCl4 in rats. Journal of Translational Medicine, 14, 281. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-016-1040-4

 

Beelharz, J., Kaakoush, N., Maniam, J., & Morris, M. (2016). The Effect of Short-term Exposure to Energy-matched Diets Enriched in Fat or Sugar on Memory, Gut Microbiata and Markers of Brain Inflammation and Plasticity. Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 57, 304-313. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2016.07.151

 

Divya, P., Karthikeyan, R., Sinduja, B., Grace, A., Abraham John, S., Hahn, J., & Dharuman, V. (2019). Carbon dots stabilized silver–lipid nano hybrids for sensitive label free DNA detection. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 133, 48-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2019.03.027

 

Kinyanjui, J., Head, J., & Talbott, M. (2015). Rapid Quantitation of Protein Samples. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, 35(2), 14-15. http://doi.org/10.1089/gen.35.02.08

 

Ngoennet, S., Nishikawa, Y., Hibino, T., Waditee-Sirisattha, R., & Kageyama, H. (2018). A Method for the Isolation and Characterization of Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids from Cyanobacteria. Methods and Protocols, 1(4), 46. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/mps1040046

Top of This Page